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Frequently asked questions

What will you test for?


We offer a range of different test packages which you can view on our website. Or you can
discuss with the doctor/adviser who can advise on which tests are appropriate for you.




How will the tests be done?


Once you have chosen any testing you need, this will be done at our Private GP practice in Marlow - which sees patients for many different aspects of health - so no potentially embarrassing waits in an STI clinic waiting room! When you arrive, you can either give your name or just give your appointment time to the receptionist. All of our tests are via urine or blood sample. Swabs are not normally necessary, except for exceptional circumstances




Can I see a female/male doctor?


Yes, providing they are working that day you can request who you’d like to see. If they are not, we can arrange an appointment for you.




Will I have to have embarrassing swabs?


No, all of our tests can be done via urine and blood tests. Swabs are not normally necessary, except for exceptional circumstances




Can I bring someone else with me?


Yes you can. Please bear in mind the sensitive questions you may be asked and the possible need for an examination, as to whether you want them in the room with you.




Will you tell my own NHS GP?


Our service is confidential. In exceptional circumstances (for example an untreated infection) we may need to share your information with another health care provider in your best interests but we would always discuss this with you first.




How long will it take to get my results?


This will depend on the test you have chosen. Most results are availble next day.




Can I also have a smear test done?


Yes we do also offer this service. Please request it when booking.




I’m a man. What sexually transmitted infections should I test for?


If you are male and don’t have any symptoms you will need to provide a urine sample, which we will test for chlamydia and gonorrhoea. Men will also do a blood test for HIV and syphilis, and occasionally hepatitis B or C.




I’m a woman. What sexually transmitted infections should I test for?


If you are female and don’t have any symptoms you will have a urine for chlamydia and gonorrhoea and and optional blood test for HIV and syphilis at the same time at no extra cost.




What are some symptoms of sexually transmitted infections in women?


Common STI symptoms in women include: • change in vaginal discharge (fluid) • redness or itching • pain • pain during sex • heavier periods • spotting • needing to urinate frequently • discomfort when urinating • ulcers or sores • lumps on the skin If you’ve been having anal sex, you may notice a change in bowel habit such as pain, constipation or diarrhoea, blood or mucus in your stools. If you have any of these symptoms, come see us as soon as possible.




What are some symptoms of sexually transmitted infections in men?


Common STI symptoms in men include: • discharge (fluid) coming from the tip of the penis • redness or itching • pain in the testicles • discomfort when urinating • needing to urinate frequently • ulcers or sores • lumps on the skin If you’ve been having anal sex, you may notice a change in bowel habit such as pain, constipation or diarrhoea, blood or mucus in your stools. If you have any of these symptoms, come see us as soon as possible. Plan ahead regarding how you will protect yourself and your sexual partners from infections when under the influence of alcohol or other recreational drugs.




How do I protect myself against sexually-transmitted infections or HIV?


Have safe sex. Safer sex means having sex with less risk of transmission (catching or passing on) an STI. The risk of catching each infection is different and varies according to the type of sex you are having (eg oral, vaginal or anal sex). For example. herpes is often passed on through oral sex, but HIV is rarely passed on this way. Anal sex carries the highest risk of passing on infections such as HIV and hepatitis, followed by vaginal and then oral sex. Non-penetrative sex (such as body rubbing and mutual masturbation) carries the lowest risk, but some infections (such as warts and herpes) can be passed on in this way. Come in and speak to a GP for more information.




How do I make sex safer?


You can reduce the risk of all infections by using condoms for all types of penetrative sex (vaginal and anal). You may also want to consider condoms for oral sex. Having non penetrative sex, such as body rubbing and mutual masturbation, and reducing the number of partners you have sex with, reduces the risk of transmitting infections. You should always get tested for STIs before having sex with someone new and advise that they get tested too. If you are at risk of hepatitis B, get vaccinated. We can provide these vaccinations at the same time as any testing. Cost £165 for a course of 3.